Warm-Ups in Google Classroom

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One does not say no to Elissa. And because I adore her!

We do warm-ups every day, and kids know it’s always the top assignment in their Google Classroom Stream.

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I put 4 days worth of warm-ups on one Google Doc, like this week’s.

The warm-ups that make up the 4 days on the Google Doc are normally from any of these sources:

The 5th day is always a visual pattern — and this is on Google Draw so kids can mark it up.

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How much time I allot for each warm-up depends on the question, from 3 to 5 minutes. Going over their answers as a whole class takes another 3 to 5 minutes. Every so often a warm-up takes 20 minutes, and that’s perfectly okay. When kids have a lot to share/discuss, I’d be a fool to stop them.

The warm-up below, for example, could be a full-blown PoW, so I gave students about 10 minutes of quiet individual time. This student finished up her thoughts for homework because she wanted to — and because math, and because my kids are better than yours.

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12 Comments

  1. Elissa Miller
    Posted May 23, 2016 at 8:11 pm | Permalink

    How do you make it the top assignment in the Google Classroom Stream? How do you assign it a due date and count the ones that are done. Did I mention I haven’t ever actually used classroom yet? =) =) =)

    Do students work ahead when you give them the template for the whole week? But I guess nobody cares, right?

    • Fawn
      Posted May 23, 2016 at 8:41 pm | Permalink

      To move it to top assignment, click on the 3 dots and choose “move to top.”

      null

      Silly you, once you start using Classroom and setting up your classes, you’ll figure out the answers to all your questions.

      I don’t think students work ahead because I put on the timer. And if some do, I really don’t care. Besides, that just shows they can’t wait to do more!

  2. Posted May 23, 2016 at 8:19 pm | Permalink

    I care. Do students work ahead? Many of mine would have the warm ups done on Monday. I use the same idea in my class.
    Monday: Estimation 180 – write in journal low estimate, high estimate, actual estimate and reasoning. (I’ve been doing this orally for the past two weeks and we go through several days on Monday. The students LOVE this new method.)
    Tuesday: Mental Math – doing problems without paper etc and able to explain how to solve.
    Wednesday (block): Visual Pattern
    Thursday (block): Visual Pattern
    Friday: Which one doesn’t belong?

    I like the idea of posting it in classroom to get thoughts from all students, but then I have one more thing that I haven’t checked.

    Would love to get ideas for giving feedback.

    • Fawn
      Posted May 23, 2016 at 8:48 pm | Permalink

      I do ask them to NOT move forward, but like I mentioned to Elissa, I don’t care if they did! If your kids have the warm-ups all done on Monday, then I think you’re allowing them too much time! When the timer goes off, and I need their attention as a whole class, I have them turn their laptops toward me (so they don’t have to shut down the computer as we might use it again) to shift their focus away from their little screens.

      Also, you don’t have to check everything. Call on a few random students to share. Personally check a few randomly later. Done!

      • Posted May 23, 2016 at 9:09 pm | Permalink

        I also use a timer and stop at or very soon after it goes off. I have my students pair share as well. What I meant by checking, it that google classroom has a grading feature that kills hours once I start looking and commenting on student work. I much prefer the oral feedback I give. Not only do I know they heard me, I often see the results soon after, which I don’t see after my written/typed comments.

        I have done warm ups in Google Classroom, (just one day at a time, not several) but not for awhile since students didn’t have comments completed. As you say though, the Ss could go back later which is a good thing. And if they don’t…???

        I’ve got to try this again. Thanks!

  3. Christine
    Posted May 29, 2016 at 1:16 pm | Permalink

    Fawn, do you think that Google Classroom could be a good alternative instead of “usual teaching” for preparing on tests? And if you agree, why do you think so? (Have I already mentioned that I love your blog :-)

    • Fawn
      Posted May 29, 2016 at 8:23 pm | Permalink

      Hi Christine. I’m not sure I understand your question. My post was on doing warm-ups in Google Classroom. We still hit the textbook to cover grade-level standards via direct instruction, classroom discussion, concept exploration (via specific tasks related to content), and doing exercises in the textbook. Thank you.

  4. Christine
    Posted May 30, 2016 at 11:48 pm | Permalink

    Hello Fawn, sorry if my question was not suitable to the topic. I am a student in pedagogy and I am very interested in various kinds of teaching methods. I dont have any experience in google classroom and I wondered if it could also be used for situations in which students have to pass an exam for example. So sorry again if my question was a bit confusing.

  5. Posted May 31, 2016 at 12:55 pm | Permalink

    I finally set up a Pinboard account and just added all those sites. I never cease to be amazed at the wonders of the MTBoS.

  6. Ceili
    Posted July 18, 2016 at 10:36 am | Permalink

    I love the idea of using Google Classroom for warmups! Do you have 1-1 ratio computers for your students, or do they share with a partner?

    • Fawn
      Posted August 9, 2016 at 1:37 am | Permalink

      Hi Ceili. We do have 1-1 laptops, and it’s been wonderful!! Google Classroom is the bee’s knees.

  7. Annie Adams
    Posted August 11, 2016 at 8:30 am | Permalink

    Hey Fawn,

    How you do you assess or give feedback for the warm-ups? I know that you can add comments, etc. in google classroom to the docs. I love the accountability piece here with google classroom, but I don’t have one to one everyday (labs, fight with other Ts for them), but I’m working on that. Either way, the work of your one student there is just….well… I just want to make my students be like a smidgen as good as yours are…
    Also, I’m teaching mostly 9th graders (CPM Integrated 1 and 2), and am wondering if you have any tips for warm ups for that grade level….even though I think these are pretty much exactly what they need anyway.

    Thank you!
    Annie

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